How far do we have to go to make the Future Internet Secure

Title of the session: How far do we have to go to make the Future Internet Secure? Research challenges and perspectives for the FI

Session organisers: Jim Clarke (Waterford Institute of Technology – WIT), Carmen Fernandez Gago (University of Malaga), Fabio Martinelli (CNR), Paul Malone (WIT), Nick Wainwright (HP)

Session description

The session will be co-organised by the BIC, NESSoS and SECCORD projects and will engage EU and international researchers across the breadth of Future Internet (FI) trust and security research.
This session will provide a forward looking view on relevant trustworthy ICT future issues and how security-by-design can address these, looking at these issues both at a European and international level. Each actor in the infrastructure, data and services space must play their part in making the ecosystem secure. With this in mind, the following priority areas will be addressed in three distinct sessions:

Topics:

1. Secure network and infrastructures – where are the new vulnerabilities and how to address them?
Chair: Brian Honan, IRISS.
Participant: Dirk Kuhlman, HP Labs.
Participant: Ruben Rios, University of Malaga.

2. Security and big data – what are the issues and how can we respond?
Chair: Nick Wainwright, HP Labs.
Participant: Stephen O’Boyle, Espion .
Participant: Henning Arendt, Arendt Business Consulting.

3. Trustworthy software and services – how far can we go beyond the current state of the art?
Chair: Rodrigo Diaz, Atos.
Participant: Hisain Elshaafi, TSSG, Waterford Institute of Tecnology.
Participant: Mike Surridge, University of Southampton.

Future research into Trustworthy ICT will be influenced by many factors; current perceptions and attitudes towards the Internet as well as changes in the way end users (citizens) perceive the role of the Internet in their lives and how they use it on a day-to-day basis, changes in the way business is conducted, how different sectors are being affected by developments in technology and by changes in the broader socio-economic landscape [1].
We have been working on making the Internet secure for as long as we have been working on building the Internet, yet the prize of a completely secure internet is elusive. For every advance in internet security, hackers and others find a way around it. When we focus on existing gaps in the security story, new infrastructures, platforms, services, clients and software emerge that require attention, such as the shift to new mobile clients, apps and app-stores, the so-called Internet of Things that links the physical world and the virtual world and the increasing prevalence of ‘big data’ across the internet. The scale and growth of the internet creates new security challenges that come together with the new settings as well as new vulnerabilities. Systems will become more open and this will influence the way services are created and adapted and how security will be adopted in them [2].
In this session, we aim to engage visionaries in the security space, industry experts and software engineering experts (with a security focus), in order to:
1. Determine the measure for whether we have achieved ‘enough security’ or not;
2. Identify and discuss key approaches going beyond the current research lines that can make a significant progress and estimate their cost;
3. Prioritize the top areas that maximize the ROI for a trustworthy internet in the 2020 timeframe.

The target audience will be anyone interested in the increased escalating issues in the ICT trust and security domain in Europe and beyond.
The main outcomes of the session will be:
• To bridge the gaps between traditionally divergent communities such as those working in internet security, infrastructures, services, networks, and data, as they should work in cooperation towards the common general goal;
• To build a consensus around the priorities for new research designed to make the internet secure in the H2020 timeframe;
• To provide a session report for the programme management community (e.g. EU Commission) with the prioritized research challenges and perspectives for H2020.

Agenda
The agenda is put together in order to ensure the most relevant and interactive discussion
1. Presentation of the main research challenges for security in H2020 based on the available findings of several EU projects including BIC, NESSOS and EFFECTSPLUS;
2. Keynote / Discussion – Secure network and infrastructures – where are the new vulnerabilities and how to address them?
3. Keynote / Discussion – Security and big data – what are the issues and how can we respond?
4. Keynote / Discussion – Trustworthy software and services – how far can we go beyond the current state of the art?
5. Wrap up session for identification and prioritization of the main research challenges for H2020.

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